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with my wife in westminster hall when he addressed both houses of our parliament as the democratically-elected president of all south africans. and i know i speak on behalf of the people in my constituency, holborn and st. pancras because they have a very special relationship with the anti-apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in the holborn halls in the summer of 959. 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town tube station. and its headquarters were always located in our area. it always had our support. so local people were particularly delighted when mr. mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque this memory of ruth first who was murdered by the south african secret police and joe slovo who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet, and i'm delighted to see here observing us today his daughter, gillian. over many years committed people be in britain campaigned against apartheid, against the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and against the imprisonment that followed.
elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone from world leaders to celebrities. >> when he visited the u.s., aretha franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "night line". >> this special edition of night line will be back in 60 sec >> this is a special edition of "nightline" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from h
. >> it is really an ordeal to be in public life sometimes. >> is winning elections worth the ordeal? and how do you fend off the attacks? we'll ask our strategists coming up. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. hands for holding. feet, kicking. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to manage your ra, now may be the time to ask about xeljanz. xeljanz (tofacitinib) is a small pill for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start taking xeljanz if you have any kind of infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or in
mandela had been elected president the night before, and i had the honor of being the first western journalist that day to shake his hand and sit down and talk with him. mandela showed no bitterness or anger. he was famous for that. no thought of revenge when i asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk, he spoke only of reconciliation and working together. >> our relations with mr. de klerk are fairly good. and he is one of those republicans i hold in high regard. we have had some differences. we have quarreled. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we are able to shake hands and think of the interest of south africa. and he has had that experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with majority in the elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect a government -- as well as governments would re
. but non-white people need add internal passport. papers please. at the end of world war ii, the election in south africa in 1948 unexpectedly brought to power a nationalist government on a platform they called apartness. in their language, it was pronounced apartheid. they started codifying immediately all the various ways that they could separate the population by race and treat people according to the ways that they thought the various races should be treated. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other, whether or not you got married, the immorality act of 1950 made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. also in 1950 the population registration act which made everyone in the country register by race and receive a racial classification, black, white, indian or colored. those were the four categorieca. and there were a million sub categories beneath those. not beneath white of course, white was just white. but for everybody else it could be a little more complicated. also in 1950, the group a
cast their ballot in the first democratic election. this morning applause for the first black voter. mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all of its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight but now this is a time to heal the old wound and to build a new south africa. ♪ >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary. the voice of his people and more accomplished. >> abc news. >> today following his passing the new south african president, president zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son and our people have lost a father. >> a man whose fighting spirit was matched by his humility and compassion. few hew human beings present either one of those sides in the amount that he did and he had both. >> absolutely. [ dad ] ah! lily... she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains an
of congress be ineligible for re-election if they don't beat search benchmarks, like the deficit being beneath a certain percentage of the gdp. it's a lot. >> or certain congressman who get a lot of air time like paul ryan and that's a taste of what we'll see pretty soon. ronan, thanks for stopping by today. today's producer pick comes to us from associate producer kristen bukaria. a georgia court has ordered a man to pay up for breaking his promise to marry. he owes his one-time fiance 50,000 large even though the man claims he never officially popped the question. you can read more by heading to thomas roberts facebook page. you've got to put a ring on it, nice tune. we'll be right back. ♪ if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for over ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specifi
election where all races were allowed to participate, nelson mandela was overwhelming elected to the presidency. he was battling a respiratory infection since early june. a remarkable man and a remarkable life and a model of stick-to-itiveness and never give up. a man of tremendous heart and compassion. dead this night at the age of 95. joining me tonight for our coverage on the passing of nelson mandela and joy reed of the grio and also with us tonight, dr. james peterson of lehigh university. i will start with you. a remarkable man. a life that is a true treasure to humanity. >> he is a star across all lines. >> you cannot compartmentalize him to a politician or a founting of south africa. here's a man who fought the hate and the bigotry and the institutional apartheid of a nation without internalizing it. he was able to reconcile a nation and move it forward and revolutionize it nonviolently, without firing one bullet. i was an election observer in 19 nor in johansburg the night they lowered the flag of apartheid. we met with him many times and to see this transition happen
, he belongs to the ages. >> as a newly elected senator in 2005, senator obama ma now president obama of course met with nelson mandela. in 2006, as a senator. barack obama went to south africa, he visited rock bib island, and then just last summer, he was in south africa unable to meet face to face with nelson mandela, because of the leaders ailing health. he did meet with his family, he came away very move bid the experience. another thing that president obama comes back to over and over again, if you look at the literature, what he has written and said about his relationship and now he looks up to him, the way he behaves when he was removed to prison, instead of retribution and revenge against those that held him captive, he embraced them. you know i am really struck by number of things -- especially african-americans and nelson mandela. and you can sort of feel it in the words of the president of the united states. s there a sense about the relationship that president obama has said with this man? >> well, i think in the brief time -- and they have only met once. but obviously the
, they were awarded the nobel peace prize. a year later he became south africa's first democratically elected president. >> it's time for the healing of the wounds. a society in which all south africans both black and white will be able to walk tall in a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> as president, mandela worked to combat illiteracy and poverty. local elections were held and improvements were made. he served just one-year term and stepped down. throughout the remainder he met with world leaders and he was a order waed the presidential medal of freedom and was a tireless advocate for peace and charity and the fight against aids. president obama met mandela only once while he was a senator in 2005. as president mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to r
. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly
in order to ensure their participation in the elections and the inauguration ceremonies will now be resolved as a result of recent consultations. this would be a welcome demonstration by the private sector of its involvement in the beautiful future we are all trying to build. we have devoted time to a discussion of economic questions because they are fundamental to the realisation of the fundamental objectives of the reconstruction and development programme below i mention some of the work in which the relevant governments are already involved to translate these objectives into reality. the government will take steps to ensure the provision of clean water on the basis of the principle of water security for all and the introduction of proper sanitation sensitive to the protection of the environment. we are determined to address the dire housing shortage in a vigorous manner, acting together with the private sector and the communities in need of shelter. health also remains a fundamental building block of the humane society we are determined to create through the implementation of
democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i remember one joke he used to tell when a group of journalist west were gathered in his house and we were sitting talking to him before the interview and he joked about how when he was in jail and the antiapartheid protests started he was told by someone a lot of the kids in london when they were protesting believed that free was his first name because free nelson mandela was the postcard placard they were holding up. t
and the uninsured. that are eligible for the exchanges. this is like looking as election night returns five minutes after the polls 0 close. we don't know yet. >> what is interesting or what we're finding out, in a lot of states it's not just the republican governor states or republican leader states that are having the problems. in in maryland, dominated by a democratic government and legislature. it's one of the biggest problems, and that flies the the in face or of what the administration is arguing, the republican governors are trying to tear this thing apart and stop it in its tracks. >> it's too early. the results are too early. the real issue here, neil, when you look at what these people are expected to buy. young people are expected to pay 10% of their after-tax income for health insurance policy that might have a $2,000 deduct illinois and some states the deductible is up to $6,000. these people are the healthy, invincibles and not a lot of people have disposable income no matter they're age to to have to put 10% of your disposable income out for something that is a piece of paper with a
george h.w. bush said the following. >> president clinton was in the white house when mandela was elected president of south africa. clinton saying the following. >> former president jimmy carter paying tribute to nelson mandela saying, his passion for freedom and justice created new hope for generations that have impressed people worldwide. the president of the united states often referred to as the leader of the free world but yet you can see from the statements in each of these men, they were in awe of nelson mandela. >> and a simple beginning to life. when you look at the place where he is going to be buried and cnn will be taking you through the days of mourning, ten days of morning in sfrouth africa. he had the desire to be buried in his hometown. >> he is going home. >> yes, he is going home. >> we will continue to bring you the life of nelson mandela all morning. >>> now to another big story. >> the weather. when we come back, we are going to tell you about this deadly winter storm that is wreaking havoc across our country. hundreds of flights have already been canceled. roads are
government or how we end apartheid or how we have democratic elections. >> reporter: the negotiations begin in secret. the government does not want it publicly known that they are speaking with the enemy. mandela by not consulting with the anc leadership nknows they can disavow them if the negotiations go poorly. it is a risk he must take. >> the reason he made that decision is because he realized somebody had to start doing something. >> reporter: in 1988 the 70-year-old mandela is moved to yet another prison outside cape town. >> he's sent to another prison which is like a country club compared to where he had been before. >> reporter: negotiations continue, and slowly other prisoners are released. including mandela's friend and mentor, walter susulu in october 1989. >> there was this sense that mandela would be getting out of jail, and people were generally excited. you could feel it in the air. >> reporter: to the majority of black south africans, mandela's release and all that it represents is what they have spent nearly 30 years hoping for, fighting for, dying for. as that buildup rea
elected president in this country in 1994. he will lie there for three days. the first day will be for vips and visitors coming in from around the world, to come pay their respects. ordinary south africans are expected to line up of course to come and say good-bye to the man they call the father of this nation. then on day nine, so whether that is friday or saturday next week, he will be flown by military aircraft, accompanied by his family to his ancestral homestead in the eastern cape region. this is where he said he wanted to be buried, where his final resting place is to be. the hills, the rural area where he grew up as a barefoot young boy walking and shepherding sheep through the hills. he had a very nostalgic memory of those times and he very much wanted to be laid to rest there. so the funeral will take place in this grand amphitheater of rural south africa, really not much around there, so expect to see heads of state, royalty from around the world make this incredible journey not just to the southern tip of africa, but to this rural homestead and it's there that t
's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified in laura to make him ready for the struggle of his people he struggled to end during wars of resistance in their land. that degree gave him rights to practice law. he and oliver established the first black law firm. december 5, 1955 he would be on the other side of the law following a country wide sweep by police that would put him and 155 activists on trial for treason while which dragged on to the 28 accused were acquitted march 29, 1961. the headline from fox news desk this afternoon. just before midnight, about 20 minutes ago the south african president announced his long struggle in the hospital since june and before has come to an end. the iconic civil rights leader and former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is dead today at 95. fox news new york continuing coverage on fox news channel, satellite and cable, more coverage later on your late local news. we continue our coverage on fox news channel across the cou
that were criticizing him. nelson mandela, i was on election observer in 1994, and mandela was being attacked by black nationalists that felt he sold out and de klerk by africaners that felt he sold out. they had to fight inside their own base to have this reconciliation which makes them even greater figures. how do you deal with having to balance those that are with you, think you're too soft, those that think you're too hard and find a way to go down the middle. that's where greatness is achieved. >> every revolutionary man or woman has that great challenge. >> absolutely. >> wow. >> let's look back to the 1961 when the 42-year-old activist gave his first televised interview. >> i went to see the man who organized this, a 42-year-old african lawyer nelson mandela the most dynamic man in south africa today. the police were hunting for him at the time but african nationalists arranged for me to meet him at his hide out. this is mandela's first television interview. i asked him what it was that the african really wanted. >> the africans require one franchise of one-man/one-vote. >> do
the rest of the world, pretty much i was a big fan, and bill worked with me to help get me elected mayor and he was a deputy mayor and he was insistent we could get nelson mandela to come to new york, this is june of 1990, and i said, well, terrific if we can do it. but this was the first place to which he came outside of south africa was to the united states and he might well have gone to washington or atlanta, a lot of other place scbloos london. >> >> rose: london. >> right. but we were fortunate. he stayed here and he -- and when he stayed with my bride and me in gracie mansion. >> rose: he was your overnight guest. >> more than -- it was almost a week. (laughter.) >> and he is a remarkable human being, the most amazing thing is that total absence of bitterness. >> rose: really? .. >> and he was the same whether playing with grandchildren, we had a granddaughter at that time, i think she was born in february and this was june, she is a little thing, and he was saying then or whether being questioned by ted koppel. >> rose: on nightline. >> nightline. ted koppel leaned in and he said
far and wide to find someone who knows politics and elected as a republican governor and served four presidents including one democrat named obama. and the only name we could come up with is huntsman. yes, that's my dad jon. welcome to "the cycle." we've banished luke to the remote camera so you can be surrounded by beautiful women, a man with five daughters -- >> i have to say, i've been at a lot of tables but never been so intimidated. and so honored, i have to tell you, it's a great treat to be with you. >> we love having your daughter as well. >> i came to see whether she's been naulgty or nice and tour'e isn't here to give me the straight scoop. >> he wishes he could be but dad, you've been in politics a very long time, before i was born. your first job was advance man for reagan. have you seen it this divided? >> no, i think historically you have to go back to the 1890s when we've been this divided. people feel that divided system, they sense it in all of the discussions that take place on capitol hill. and the fact of the matter is we are divided. and something needs to be don
the first democratically elected president. once that process is over on day nine essentially of this program, he will be flown by military aircraft along with the elders vip political figures and his family, which is large, they'll be flown down to his hometown and then the military, the state will effectively hand over his body, his coffin, his casket to the family at the get as of the homeinstead, i think from what we understand there will be a shift from moving the south african flag to putting a blanket over his casket, which will symbolize him coming home to his ancestral land. then there will be atate funeral in the ground of his ancestral home in the hills where he walked and played as a young child. so there really is a sense of a full circle of life here going back to those rural roots. >> so many.iant moments to come. thank you so much, such good work. such a long day four. we appreciate it. thank you. >>> and president barak obama paid his respects tog during a televised event. he credits mr. mandela with his first political action company against apartheid. this i
, they have a unity government. mandela is the first elected president of multiracial south africa. he makes the clerk his deputy president so there's a clear sign to the country, this is about reconciliation, moving forward. this is not about recriminations and bitterness. that's the inspiring part. inagree with you, bob. some of those countries, communists or whatever, were the few countries willing to support a nelson mandela. you know what is the key, afterwards, he says no to violence and no to those communists. >> juan, we want to thank you. our fellow co-host of "the five" for being with us tonight and sharing those reflections. >>> coming up, mr. bob beckle was down at his house in d.c. last weekend putting u.n. h int christmas lights. we're not sure how hard he actually worked. don't miss the annual light show. bob's just talking away. he's very excited. we've got a special package for you and it's coming up. huma. even when weross our t's and dot our i's, we still run io problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car repla
doing the things that i want to do and i think the people of kentucky elected me to do and i'm just not ready to make a decision yet. >> thanks for joining us. it's always a pleasure to talk with you, sir. >>> up next, the website is working better, but are obama care's problems solved? dr. emanuel, one of the law's architects, returns to fox news sunday. >>> plus, today marks ten years since i joined the fox family. >> good morning and welcome to fox news sunday, volume two. >> oh, my gosh. well, we'll have some of the highlights later in the program and we'd like you to logon to facebook and share some of your favorite moments on our page and we'll be right back. [ paper rustles, outdoor sounds ] ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on er
think the people of kentucky elected me to do and i'm just not ready to make a decision yet. >> thanks for joining us. it's always a pleasure to talk with you, sir. >>> up next, the website is working better, but are obama care's problems solved? dr. emanuel, one of the law's architects, returns to fox news sunday. >>> plus, today marks ten years since i joined the fox family. >> good morning and welcome to fox news sunday, volume two. >> oh, my gosh. well, we'll have some of the highlights later in the program and we'd like you to logon to facebook and share some of your favorite moments on our page and we'll be right back. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that wothat's correct.a rate. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark? go get help! i have my reasons. look, you don't have to feel trapped with our raise your rate cd. if our rate on this cd goes up, yours can too. oh that sounds nice. don't feel trapped with the ally raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. yeah... try new alka seltzer fruit chews. they work fast on heartburn and t
states, were walking out, and then president-elect mandela, just moments he was having brief meetings. after he met with the vice president, there were a few reporters, and he shuffled over and very quietly and shook our hands and asked how we were doing. on this days when, that's who he was, this quiet dignity and grace. i want to show this. the vips were given this. and some of us hung around. >> you were working for the associated press. >> at the time. this is the new stamp they issued that day, commemorating the new president, but there was a new national anthem, a new flag, an there's a commemorative stamp. these are the parliament buildings, i believe they're called the union buildings, and in this courtyard is where the ceremony w ld. you ha a who's who o wld balcony in the union building, and these generals in the military white dress uniforms, white men, handing over power to nelson mandela. at that moment everybody was crying, reporters, people in the stands, it was just amazing watching these white men in white dress uniforms essentially hand the power of south africa to t
was a newly elected senator but first president of the united states and first black president of south africa, that would have photo opportunity. gwen: that would have been something. michael, the interesting thing about mandela, during all the been working as reporters and traveling this country, there was a real domestically between americans in general and him. so many, there are parallels between the south and america'seid own history of racial oppression and the rise from that and they've made so the story resonates with peopleit in this country. theas interesting, outpouring. apolloquee at the theater had words up honoring him, people spontaneously showed south african embassy, thetician from the left and right praised him. hisarzenegger talking about example and existence of god. strikingly different than when he came out of prison. drove this athat the time was the sanctions movement, the idea of punishing releasedica until it mandela. we remembered the music, we remembered the chants, we the protests. did it work and does it still? >> it definitely hurt south africa. they were denied
the election of obama. >> here is former pennsylvania senator rick santorum comparing the fight against apartheid in south africa to the battle over obama care. >> he was fighting against some great injustice. i would make the argument we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that has taken over and is controlling people's lives and obama care is front and center in that. >> ryan, what gives? >> i think we have to add apartheid -- >> f.w. de klerk, such a better person than mitch mcconnell. >> we have to add apartheid to that list of issues you shouldn't compare in modern american politics -- >> right. naziism, slavery, apartheid. >> there are issues that were unique historically and no matter how bad you think things are in american politics right now, comparisons are never going to be apt. >> nelson mandela supported universal health care. i think the comparison, like the pope, i think the comparison is kind of -- >> i would tell you this. i think neither side should be using the man, a dead man, deceased man we are honori
the people of kentucky elected me to do. i just am not ready to make a decision yet. >> senator paul, thank you. thanks for joining us. always a pleasure to talk with you, sir. >> thanks. >>> up next, the website is working better. but are obama care's problems solved? dr. ezequiel emanuel, one of the law's architects, returns to "fox news sunday." >>> plus, today marks ten years since i've joined the fox family. >> good morning and welcome to "fox news sunday" volume 2. >> oh, my gosh. well, we'll have some of the highlights from the past decade later in the program. we'd like you to logon to facebook and share some of your favorite moments on your page. and we'll be right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with inv
elect better leaders and run our country better and continue to be a democratic society. how do south africans teach their children about what happened in the past. >> there are different ways. and south africa has a yum of -- a number of museums. and there is also a intergenerational conversations that go often in fa families where a gran grandmother will tl the children about what it was like glowing up. and the younger stories that seismic about what if meant to go grow and the integrated schools. they are all earring all ears wo know who this great man was. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> it's not winter yet but you wouldn't no it in the weather. a mix of snow and sleet and freezing rain has dragging across the country eyein icing s across the northeast. hahazardous conditions causing pile ups on the roadways and claudkef kevin is here to tell us what to expect. >> it's not winter yit. winter r in meteor logical winter. and with these wair weather pats and this icing it poor trays that portrays that. when you factor in the wind. bismark, north dakota, -25. now earlier we
forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you saw the same thing when mr. obama was on the verge of being elected. one other thing they have in common, we talk about mr. mandela serving 27 years in prison but we don't necessarily talk about why and what were the core issues there. they were dedicated to the premise of one person, one vote. so without that 1965 voting rights act, which is a direct product of the civil rights movement, mr. obama's presidency does not exist. they're bound together by that same issue and the activism that was required in order to make -- >> that's a good point. >> in addition to the comparisons between the two of them, which is important, i think the other remarkable thing is the thread of liberty that connects them across space and time. the abolitionist improvement inspired thorough who inspired gandhi who inspired mandela. i
. and to celebrate the first democratic elections in south africa we were in our hotel looking over at the ceremonies in a park and flying over us were 11 jets roaring, fighter jets roaring above our heads, fanning out in vapor trails the colors of the south african flag. the jets were flown by black south african women, symbolically that caused us much celebration in our hotel. and since apartheid ended two million homes have been -- millions of homes have been built, millions of homes have been electrified in south africa, black families now have virtually tripled in the country. so nelson mandela ushered in a dramatically different kind of south africa. and we thought that it was our responsibility to play a small part in that struggle, because our country was a major part of the black communities problem in south africa. we were on the wrong side of the issue and on the wrong side of history. >> schieffer: it is story that has not yet ended and story that goes on. mr. robinson, thank you so much for being with us today. >> thank you for having me. >> schieffer: we'll be back in one minute with
of apartheid. he would go on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i do hereby promise to be faithful to the republic of south africa. wasorn to a local chief, he one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. he began opposing the white minority a policy of apartheid, laws that segregated society and made colored south africans second-class citizens. byst, mandela was moved gandhi. more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of led ational congress, he violent sabotage attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail that he was never forgotten. eventually, international and to sayl pressure led apartheid would be dismantled down the mandela would walk free. rather than seek richer view hising, he reached out to former oppressors trying to heal a divided nation. 1990 three, they shared the nobel peace prize. for fellow south africans and we want them to is crucial toh the contribution they have made towards a democratic party. >> he voted for the first time in 1994 with millions of his fellow bla
after mandela was elected president he turned to sport to help unite his still divided country. it was the 1995 rugby world cup. mandela encouraged the nation to believe in the slogan of one team, one country. the image of mandela wearing the color and handing the trophy to the team captain was a symbol of unification. 63,000 people in the stands for the game. afterwards, the captain summed up saying we didn't have the support of 63,000 south africans today, we have the support of 42 million. we are hearing from ali tonight. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. his was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. today, his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. >> some of the best in sports. >> it really is. >> thank you, dianna. >> nbc "nightly news" is coming up next. it is a one hour special report on nelson mandela. >> s once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the thi
. >> congresswoman waters, you were one of the leaders, a state elected physician and first pushed for divestment of the pension funds there. how difficult was that fight when you first led it to try to get america on the right side of history? >> well, divestment in the state of california was not an easy chore. i was a member of the california state assembly. i certainly introduced legislation but it took me years of working on the whole education of what was going on inside south africa for my colleagues. i had to do clippings every day. my staff clipped from wherever we could find information to teach them about who nelson mandela was who winnie mandela was, what was apartheid, what is anc, that is african national congress. it took years leading up to dive divestment. because i was fortunate enough to serve on the board of trans africa we were part of the strategy that not only did rallying and arrested at the embassy and took over the south african consulate in los angeles but economic sanctions were extremely important to put pressure on the south african government to help bring down the
a lame duck president. i believe midterm elections, gop has a grand opportunity to reach out to those pop that have suffered the most. they can take over the house and senate if they do grassroots advocacy, if the tea party and party establishment would join as one we have a grand opportunity. >> chris, last word. >> a lot of this is going to fall on republicans come midterms, what do they want to do. for example, take immigration. if you want to address this issue and to be viable at a national level, you have to put something forward. if you're going to be basically trapped by fringe within your own party, you end up doing nothing. part of that is the reality. they have to come to the fact divisions are not -- >> senate republicans do something about immigration, chris. >> not house republicans. >> approval rate, low rate but we're out of time. angela, lame duck president has three years to go. >> i got you. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >> we will be right back. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in
elected president of all south africans. i know that i speak on behalf of people in my constituency, holborn and st pancras, because they have a very special relationship with the anti- apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in holborn hall in the summer of 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town underground station. its headquarters were always located in our area, and it always had our support. local people were particularly delighted when mr mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque in memory of ruth first, who was murdered by the south african secret police, and joe slovo, who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet. i am delighted that his daughter gillian slovo is here to observe our proceedings. over many years, committed people in britain campaigned against apartheid, the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and the imprisonments that followed. they continued to campaign against the oppression of all black south africans and of all the other people
childhood in the eastern cape during activism and decades in prison before being elected as south after infantry caps first black president in 1994. nelson mandela was 95. >>> fellow republicans, our beloved, nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. >> former south african president nelson mandela, a man like no other is dead at the age of 95. the reveered antiapartheid leader spent 27 years in prison. led his country to democracy and became south after infantry caps first black president. donald rumsfeld joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. sir, why is it that president mandela could do something that nobody else could? what was it about him? >> well, he had special qualities. he was a humble person. with impressive grace almost like royalty in terms of his presence. he had good humor. and gentleness, but steel in his backbone and resolve and conviction. i think one of the things that possibly was different about him, he had that wonderful ability to put himself in other people's shoes. and try to look at tough issues from their persp
south africa's first multi racial election he helped welcome the 19959 rugby world cup to south africa. then would he won it. it couldn't have been a better story. his soccer legacy though came years later when south africa was awarded the honor of saging the 2010 world cup finals. the ailing former leader was there at the end of it all. it he didn't attend the early part. let's bring in cnn sports. i was honored. i got to go there, cover it. it was awesome. it was such a thrill for a football fan. talk about mandela's role in getting the world cup to south africa and what it meant. >> for nelson mandela, sport was everything and allowed for harmony he brought across everybody. it allowed for hope to be generated through sport where there might not have been hope ever before and he was very instrumental in being there in 2004 when fifa awarded south africa the ability to host the world cup and then you're looking at him here in 2010 and that was a major moment. the crowd gave him a standing ovation and everybody in the stadium could actually -- it was described as kind of spine tinglin
to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson, a takeaway they can come away from mandela? because you have such an incredible diverse group of world leaders who govern differently. >> wouldn't it be great. wouldn't that just be wonderful. there are certainly many leaders out there, many conflicts that could be resolved if a little bit of mandela's forgiveness and inclusion was employed. many long time dictator and authoritarians who make take a lesson out of mandela's playbook. he stepped down after one term. he promised to serve one term and kept that promise. sure, there are many, many leaders out there who could take some serious lessons to what mandela proved as a leader on the world stage. >> and particularly the areas of compromise and the like, too. >> and forgiveness. >>
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